Schools to Learn From

Jan 28, 2016

We are happy to announce the release of a set of case studies profiling six U.S. high schools with top outcomes for ELLs. This report, funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, illustrates how schools can help ELLs achieve their fullest potential.

Working Group on ELL Policy issues statement on ESSA

Jan 08, 2016

In its statement, the Working Group highlights key aspects of the law with respect to English Learners.  With the reauthorization of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) of 2015, the Working Group highlights the continuing evolution of this landmark federal legislation to more fully include En

UL Founding Partner Helen Quinn to Receive 2016 Compton Medal | SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Nov 17, 2015

Helen Quinn, a professor emerita at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University, will receive the 2016 Karl Taylor Compton Medal for Leadership in Physics for her contributions to science education and theoretical physics.

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Thanks for your contribution to this whole world. We all salute you.
This world of science will always remember you. http://www.jeetekno.com
Thank you... <a href="http://www.caspian-alarm.com/%D8%AF%D8%B2%D8%AF%DA%AF%DB%8C%D8%B1-%DA%AF%DB%8C%D8%AA-%D9%81%D8%B1%D9%88%D8%B4%DA%AF%D8%A7%D9%87%DB%8C/" title="دزدگیر فروشگاهی">دزدگیر فروشگاهی</a> wish you success...:)

California schools holding back English Learners, say Stanford researchers and colleagues

Oct 20, 2015
New report by Kenji Hakuta, Ilana Umansky and others offers evidence of inequitable treatment of English Language Learners in California schools.
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Much of what this article describes is in fact true. I know that in at least one local distict, and with some certainty many others, arbitrary decisions are made about instructional practices that teachers must employ. This is especially true with regard to English learners. They make up acronyms and call programs either "research based" or "ed code mandated" in order to implement what they see fit. And with most teachers not looking into the validity of these claims or simply believing that a district office is only following the letter of the law (aka State Ed. Code), districts are free to act in ways that are proving detrimental to students. I know because I receive classrooms full of students classified as English Learners and are on average more than two years behind grade level and unable to complete even the simplest of language tasks. The system is broken but to admit it would be to acknowledge that we work for self-serving administrators backed by employee associations only interested in the well-being of their membership. These same district personnel will convince teachers not to re-classify Els because it is "counter-productive" to the student, who has met the criteria established, yet offer no suggestions for the instructional program that these students should then be exposed to. And those who dare speak up are demoted and/or pushed out.

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